A Song with Noun Clauses

I have found the perfect song to help you remember Noun Clauses. First, if you are not sure what a Noun Clause is, check my earlier posts Noun Clauses #1, #2, & #3.

Backstreet Boys

The Backstreet Boys ……………………. http://www.officialcharts.com

 

Next, have a look at the following song lyrics. The song is, ‘As Long As You Love Me’ by The Backstreet Boys. I have highlighted the Noun Clauses in pink and the Noun Clause Markers in bold print:

Although loneliness has always been a friend of mine, I’m leaving my life in your hands.
People say (that) I’m crazy and that I am blind, risking it all in a glance.
And how you got me blind is still a mystery.
I can’t get you out of my head.
(I) Don’t care what is written in your history as long as you’re here with me.

Chorus:
I don’t care who you are, where you’re from, what you did, as long as you love me; who you are, where you’re from;
(I) Don’t care what you did as long as you love me.

By now, you know that Noun Clause Markers are Subordinating Conjunctions and the Noun Clauses are Subordinating/Dependent Clauses. Did you notice the other Subordinating Conjunctions and Dependent Clauses in the above song lyrics? When you find the Subordinating Conjunctions, the rest is easy because the Subordinating Conjunctions are Markers at the beginning of the Dependent Clauses, just like the Noun Clause Markers.

The other Subordinating Conjunctions are: although and as long as:

Although loneliness has always been a friend of mine, I’m leaving my life in your hands.

Dependent Clause: Although loneliness has always been a friend of mine,
Independent Clause: I’m leaving my life in your hands.

I don’t care who you are, where you’re from, what you did, as long as you love me.

Dependent Clause: as long as you love me
*
a)
Independent Clause: I don’t care who you are, where you’re from, what you did.
* b) Independent Clause: I don’t care.

* There is so much happening in this sentence.
In *a), you could say that the Noun Clauses are part of the Independent Clause because the Adverb Clause (as long as you love me) is the Dependent Clause. Also, the Noun Clauses are objects of the verb ‘care’ so they are important for meaning in the Independent Clause. 

In *b), you could just say the Independent Clause is I don’t care and everything else is a Dependent Clause (four  Dependent Clauses: 3 x  Noun Clauses and 1 x Adverb Clause).

(I) Don’t care what is written in your history as long as you’re here with me.

Dependent Clause: as long as you’re here with me
*a) Independent Clause: I don’t care what is written in your history.
*b) Independent Clause: I don’t care.

*See note above.          

httpwww.dailymail.co.uktvshowbizarticle-2075810Backstreet-Boys-star-AJ-McLean-marries-model-girlfriend-Beverly-Hills-ceremony.html

httpwww.dailymail.co.uktv

Here are the other two verses from the song. I have underlined the  Subordinating (Dependent) Clauses.

Noun Clauses    Adverb Clauses    Relative Clause

Every little thing that you have said and done feels like it’s deep within me.
(It) Doesn’t really matter if you’re on the run.
It seems like we’re meant to be.

 I’ve tried to hide it so that no one knows but I guess it shows when you look into my eyes.
What you did and where you’re coming from, I don’t care, as long as you love me, baby.

The language in this song is simple yet the grammar is complex. Listen to the song a few times, practise singing it in the shower, and you will soon remember several excellent examples of Complex Sentences using Noun Clauses, Adverb Clauses and a Relative Clause. Click here for the official music video. Click here for a video with lyrics but be aware that the punctuation is not correct.

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This entry was posted in Advanced (Level 6+), Cambridge, Grammar, IELTS, Intermediate (Level 4), TOEFL, TOEIC, Upper Intermediate (Level 5) and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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